Autumn In Park City: III

 

Double Exposure – Velvia 50 – 2016

Fall is arriving in Park City very slowly this year.  Mountain Maples have been slow to change to deep reds and brilliant orange and yellow.  The aspens remain mostly green with only hints of color.  Surely the colors will change but  every year it’s different.  This year, summer seems to not want to let go.  There is a cold, rainy storm outside as I write this and the Autumn storms have arrived as they do each season.

I’ll share more images of last year and eventually images from this Autumn but just as the season suggests, I’ll take my time.

Thanks for reading,

EE

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Autumn In Park City: II

 

The Light Below – Velvia 50 – Utah

I have quite a few images to share from last year’s Fall Colors.  I even still have some that I haven’t even seen yet!  I’ll share more thoughts in a few of the posts and some will be short and simple.  Like this one:)

EE

 

Autumn In Park City

Velvia 50

Another year has passed and the season is about to change once again along the Wasatch Back of Utah.  Autumn is one of the best times of the year in Park City as the weather begins to change along with the landscape.  This summer has been quite warm and dry with limited monsoonal thunderstorms  and endless days around 90 degrees.  This can all change in matter of days here as the storms begin to roll in and Winter slowly takes over.  Autumn at 7000 ft in the Wasatch Mountains is a beautiful transition from Summer to Winter.  There are days of glowing red mountain maples with temperatures in the 80’s, foggy rainy days with saturated, colorful forests and there are cold days of white, a reminder of a season to come.

This beautiful season of change has begun in Park City and every day reveals something new in the landscape.  I’ll be sharing images from last year’s Autumn colors along with phone pics of this year’s colors as I explore this landscape with my camera.  Fall holds many different meanings for myself and others and I’m looking forward to exploring these meanings though my lens.  Some will see change, some will see balance, some will see time passing, some will see time stopping and some will simply see color.  More to come as this season progresses.

Thanks for reading,

EE

Landscape Photography and Time: III

Portra 160

A few final thoughts on how time relates to landscape photography.  I’m intentionally leaving out the details of when I made these images to illustrate the same point I made in my last post.  Maybe these were made 2 weeks ago, maybe 2 years ago, maybe 20 years ago, it doesn’t really matter to the image.  These barren landscapes, shaped by water and time, are very slow to change.  I could go to these places right now and the landscape will be nearly identical to these images.  I’ve allowed enough time to pass to separate myself from the experience of being here and seeking these compositions.  I’ve allowed enough time to pass to select images that I wish to share.

Portra 160

There’s one important point to consider when allowing this time to pass between shooting and ultimately sharing my work.  I view photography as a journey and an evolution over time.  I find it beneficial to allow time to pass but on the other end, allowing too much time to pass creates a disconnect from this journey.  My images are as much a photograph as a reflection of myself and I want my images to be records of myself at a given point in my journey.  I find it important to share my work within a relevant timeframe so this evolution is also apparent.  While I could go back to these places and the landscape will be similar, I will be different.

Thanks for reading,

EE

Ektar 100

 

Landscape Photography and Time: Part II

Continuing on from my previous post, I wanted to share some thoughts regarding the time needed between capturing an image and finally sharing the image.  This timeframe will be different for everyone and it’s something I’m still figuring out for myself.  For this post, I’m using several images which were shot in February 2016 (18 months ago) and one was only recently edited.  Shooting on film forces this process to be slower than with digital but it’s still feasible to shoot images on film, process the film and edit the image within a week.  With digital, this process can be nearly instant with images being sent directly to a device or within a day.  I have experience with all these timeframes and I think I’m coming to a better realization of what works for me.

When in the field, there’s much more that goes into capturing an image than just clicking the shutter.  This is too much to go into for this post.  Once I return home, the experience is still fresh in my mind and there is often an excitement to share a new photograph.  This excitement can interrupt my ability to view an image subjectively and can lead to sharing work that doesn’t meet the same standards I apply to other images.  It’s impossible  for me to apply the same standards for selecting images without letting some time pass after capturing an image.

Allowing time to pass after capturing an image is an editing tool that I believe is just as powerful as any software.  There is no substitute for this passage of time.  Images simply look different after the initial excitement wears off.  This is the point where I can begin to select images I’ll keep and share versus images that don’t meet my standards.  Allowing some time to pass has another benefit as well.  In the image above, I initially passed over it and have only recently shared this image.  It took me nearly 18 months to “see” this image, although something must have resonated with me at the time or I wouldn’t have clicked the shutter.   18 months is at the long end of the time I need after I capture an image before making a final decision on selecting it as a keeper.   The image below is another example  of one that I didn’t fully see until recently.

These landscape images of sand dunes, with the exception of the image above, could have been made at any time of year, any year.  There is nothing in them which hints to a season or a certain event.  They’re not even images of a particular place, just sand and light.  I used these images intentionally but this can also be applied to many other landscape images.  If you can’t identify a season or a certain atmospheric event in the image, there is nothing tying to the image to a certain point in time.   I’ll continue this thought in my next post but I’ll leave you with one question:  Why do some photographs continue to resonate with you year after year while others don’t?

Thanks for reading,

EE

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